Subrata Deb

Chair Associate Professor College of Pharmacy
B.Pharm, M.Pharm, PhD
Office: Room 2514
Phone: (305) 760 – 7479
Email: SDeb@ULarkin.org
Hours: By Appointment

Dr. Deb joined the faculty at LU in September 2017 as an Associate Professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Previously, he worked at the Roosevelt University, The University of British Columbia and Tripura University. He received his Bachelor of Pharmacy degree from the Berhampur University and his Master of Pharmaceutical Sciences from the University of Mumbai. Dr. Deb received his Ph.D. in Pharmaceutical Sciences from The University of British Columbia and subsequently completed his postdoctoral fellowship from the Vancouver Prostate Centre, a National Centre of Excellence. Dr. Deb’s teaching interests and experience include Pharmacology, Toxicology, Pharmacogenomics, and Pharmacokinetics with special emphasis on Drug Metabolism and Drug Interactions.

Dr. Deb’s research is focused on the application of absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADMET)-based principles to understand the disposition of vitamin D/other lipid derivatives and therapeutic agents in hormonal cancers and liver disorders. His work on cytochrome P450-related interactions of drugs and natural products with endobiotics and xenobiotics has highlighted the vital role of metabolic interactions in disease pathophysiology and experimental therapeutics. Alongside the laboratory experimental techniques, Dr. Deb also uses in silico tools such as simulation of ADMET and their associated interactions in pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modelling. Dr. Deb has keen interest in the utilization of pharmacogenomics concepts in unraveling drug interaction and drug action outcomes in patients.

Dr. Deb has published more than fifty peer-reviewed articles and scientific abstracts, and has presented in several international and national professional conferences. Dr. Deb serves as a reviewer for many journals in pharmaceutical sciences, drug disposition and experimental therapeutics. He is an active member of several scientific and professional organizations including American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists, and American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

I am interested in elucidating the potential mechanisms of vitamin D deficiency and metabolic drug interactions with a focus on prostate cancer/breast cancer and liver disorders. My research is focused on the application of absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADMET)-based principles to understand the disposition of vitamin D and therapeutic agents in hormonal cancers and liver disorders. My work on cytochrome P450-related interactions of drugs and natural products with endobiotics and xenobiotics has highlighted the vital role of metabolic interactions in disease pathophysiology and experimental therapeutics. I am currently utilizing in silico tools such as simulation of ADMET and their associated interactions in pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modeling. Along with the laboratory research models, I also work with the health and nutritional databases to identify potential biomarkers and to provide mechanistic analyses in hepatic dysfunction and its related drug interactions.  I have keen interest in applying pharmacogenomic concepts in unraveling drug interaction and drug action outcomes in patients.

Selected Publications

  • Mannargudia B, Deb S. Clinical pharmacology and clinical trials of ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors: Is it a viable cancer therapy? Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology 143:1499-1529 (2017).
  • Deb S, Bukowska A, Heo N, Rajab I. Interindividual variability in CYP3A activity: Influence on CYP3A-related herb-drug interactions from selected natural health supplements in human liver. The FASEB Journal 31:669.3 (2017).
  • Deb S, Chin MY, Pham S, Adomat H, Hurtado-Coll A, Gleave M, Guns ES. Steroid Metabolism in Human Prostate Cancer Tissue: Effect of CYP17 Inhibitors. The FASEB Journal 31:669.18 (2017).
  • Ben-Eltriki M, Deb S, Adomat H, Guns ES. Calcitriol and 20(S)-protopanaxadiol synergistically inhibit growth and induce apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells. Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 158:207-219 (2016).
  • Sakharkar P, Deb S. Association of hyperuricemia with liver dysfunction amongst adults with metabolic disorders in the United States: A cross sectional study. Journal of the American Pharmacists Association 56(3):e109 (2016).
  • Sakharkar P, Deb S. Liver function status among us adults having both hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia: a cross sectional study. Value in Health 19(3):A42 (2016).
  • Sakharkar P, Deb S. Examining association between liver enzymes and lipid levels amongst adults in the United States: A cross sectional study. Value In health 18(3):A136-137 (2015).
  • Deb S, Chin MY, Adomat H, Guns ES. Ginsenoside-mediated blockade of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 inactivation in human liver and intestine in vitro. Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 141:94-103 (2014).
  • Pham S, Deb S, Ming DS, Adomat H, Hosseini-Beheshti E, Zoubeidi A, Gleave M, Guns ES. Next-generation steroidogenesis inhibitors, dutasteride and abiraterone, attenuate but still do not eliminate androgen biosynthesis in 22RV1 cells in vitro. Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 144:436-444 (2014).
  • Ming DS, Pham S, Deb S, Chin MY, Kharmate G, Adomat H, Beheshti E, Locke J, Guns ES. Pomegranate extracts impact the androgen biosynthesis pathways in prostate cancer models in vitro and in vivo. Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 143:19-28 (2014).
  • Ben-Eltriki M, Deb S and Guns ES. Calcitriol enhances PPD mediated anticancer activity in prostate cancer models in vitro: Pharmacodynamic based interactions. Journal of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences 17(4): 123s (2014).
  • Chiu NT, Guns ES, Adomat H, Jia W, Deb S.  Identification of human cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in the hepatic and intestinal biotransformation of 20(S) protopanaxadiol. Biopharmaceutics and Drug Disposition 35:104-118 (2014).